Infospheres: Theory and Practice

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“Building a Nourishing Personal Infosphere: Creativity, Media, and Containment”
Marcee Monroe Ludlow

Thought and creativity are not separate from the material conditions in which they take place. What, then, are the material conditions that build a personal infosphere’s nourishing structures? How does the size of a data container, be it sticky note or spreadsheet cell, Word document, database, or filing system, affect thought and creativity?

“The Embodied Writer: Incorporating Digital Technologies into Our Writing Lives”
Sean McCarthy

Fruitfully integrating technology, such as Google Docs and Tinderbox, into our writing lives involves a careful analysis of the complex flows of information—both digital and physical—that we encounter every day. This presentation explores how digital technologies can be successfully integrated with physical spheres, combining pleasure with work.

“The Place of Creative Vision in Webspace”
Krzysztof Piekarski

Does art have a place in the sphere of information? With the plethora of websites that will whir and chime for you, where does that leave websites created to serve a personal vision? What are the benefits of eschewing template-based web platforms?

“Ego and IT: How Template Worship and Rebellion Influence Identity”
Jasmine Mulliken

Template-based websites like MySpace and Blogger dictate their users’ identity, demonstrating how technology both dehumanizes individuals and encourages narcissism, distorting reality even as it democratizes. This presentation will examine personalized uses of popular templates and discuss the implications of resisting those templates’ ubiquity.

“Avoiding Evil: Data-mining, Surveillance, and the Googlesphere”
John Jones

The increasing popularity of personal management applications—particularly Google’s suite of management tools—leaves open the possibility of compromising personal information through data-mining. This presentation outlines the challenges that Web 2.0’s “architecture of participation” presents to the infosphere and suggests ways that users can take advantage of these tools without compromising their data.


Keywords: Infosphere, Writing Technologies, Web Development, Surveillance
Stream: Human Technologies and Usability, Technology in Community
Presentation Type: Virtual Presentation in English
Paper: A paper has not yet been submitted.


Marcee Ludlow

The University of Texas at Austin
Austin, TX, USA


Sean McCarthy

The University of Texas at Austin
Austin, TX, USA


Krzysztof Piekarski

The University of Texas at Austin
Austin, TX, USA


Jasmine Mulliken

The University of Texas at Austin
Austin, TX, USA


John Jones

Assistant Director, Computer Writing and Research Lab
Department of Rhetoric and Writing, The University of Texas at Austin

Austin, TX, USA

John's work focuses on the intersections between technology and rhetoric. He is currently focusing on the embodied nature of rhetoric and the ways in which rhetoric is affected by the use of communication tools, both physical and cognitive.

Ref: T08P0080