Study Skills for the Twenty-First Century: What Study Behaviors Do Students Use with Electronic Text?

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Students report that they often do not use effective study strategies when studying in traditional paper-based formats. They report even less use of strategies when reading electronic text. Yet, today students read an increasing amount of on-line electronic text. In the information age, comprehension of this electronic-based material is essential for success in both school and the workplace. As electronic-based reading becomes increasingly essential in the classroom, educators need to provide instruction that assists students in comprehending text in this environment. This session will build on past research by the authors about the use of study skills by adolescents. A study skills survey was completed by a group of adolescents at The Hague International Model United Nations program in 2004. Adolescents reported their use of study skills in paper and electronic text. 89.9% of these adolescents reported reading computer-based text. However, many reported that they do not use crucial study skills that require comprehension, navigation skills needed to select relevant information, or assessment of the relevance of the electronic text. A second study surveyed English Language Learners aged 10 to adult and found similar results. The audience will be asked to consider their own study strategies and behaviors while using electronic text. Implications for new ways to study in the twenty-first century will be discussed.


Keywords: Study Strategies, Study Behaviors, Electronic Text and Study
Stream: Technology in Education
Presentation Type: Workshop Presentation in English
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Dr. Judy Richardson

Professor Emerita, Teaching & Learning
School of Education, Virginia Commonwealth University

Richmond, VA, USA

Dr. Judy S. Richardson is Professor Emerita and ESL Liaison at Virginia Commonwealth University. Her expertise is in adolescent and adult literacy, with recent publications such as Content area literacy lessons go high tech. (2004) Reading Online; Reading to learn in the content areas. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/ITP.(2006, 6th edition); and Study Skills in the Electronic Age. In P. Linder, M. B. Sampson, J. A. R. Dugan, & B. Brancato (Eds.), The College Reading Association Yearbook (pp. 221-235). Logan, UT: College Reading Association, authors Rhodes, J. A., Robnolt, Valerie J., & Richardson, J. S. (2006).

Dr. Richardson’s interests are in the use of technology in literacy applications and connections between English Second Language and literacy. She visits Macedonia where she is part of a team of adolescent literacy educators who are helping design a literacy-based curriculum for vocational educational schools.

Dr. Joan Rhodes

Assistant Professor, Teaaching and Learning
School of Education, Virginia Commonwealth University

Richmond, VA, USA

Dr. Joan Rhodes is an assistant professor in the School of Education at Virginia Commonwealth University. She is a faculty member in the Early/Elementary Education and Reading programs. Dr. Rhodes has over 22 years of teaching experience in diverse roles including preschool, elementary, English as a second language, middle school and collegiate level education. She has also served as a reading specialist in Fairfax and Chesterfield counties. Currently, Dr. Rhodes is the project director of the Richmond Partnership for Excellence in Early Language and Literacy Skills (PEELLS) federal Early Reading First grant. Her current interests and publications are on the topics of early literacy, strategies for improving instruction and study skills in the electronic age.

A recent article is:Study Skills in the Electronic Age. In P. Linder, M. B. Sampson, J. A. R. Dugan, & B. Brancato (Eds.), The College Reading Association Yearbook (pp. 221-235). Logan, UT: College Reading Association, authors Rhodes, J. A., Robnolt, Valerie J., & Richardson, J. S. (2006).

Dr. Valerie Robnolt

Assistant Professor, Teaching and Learning
School of Education, Virginia Commonwealth University

Richmond, VA, USA


Ref: T08P0102